Skip NavigationSkip to Primary Content

DVM

Dr. David Jolly

DVM

Dr. David Jolly

"One of the fondest and most vivid memories of my childhood is of my Welch Terrier Tweed having her first litter of puppies.   I must have been 8 or 9, and the thrilling (to me, probably not Tweed) process began just before one of my Little League baseball games was scheduled to start.  So, I raced home between each inning, wide eyed, enthralled and enchanted by the whole mesmerizing spectacle. Nothing in my short life to that point had come anywhere close to the absolute wonder of this biologic miracle, messy as it turned out to be.  My parents had to watch me closely to make sure I didn't pick up puppies and unintentionally squeeze one to death from sheer exuberance.  

A few years later, I was given a school assignment to write my "futurograpy," a description of what I thought I wanted to be when I grew up, and out popped a puffed up description of a doctor hero who saved the lives of innocents with skill, courage and very little humility.  My mom kept that for years, and was almost inconceivably happy when I went to vet school and made her proud.  Whether those two childhood happenings were the early seeds of what would later become a great love of animals in general I don't really know, but eventually that sense of wonder about critters and medicine evolved into a really deep love and compassion for all of them.  Whether that has to do with their vulnerability, their innocence, their honesty or their selfless love I also don't really know.  But I do know that those things pull a deep sense of affection out of me, and drive me strongly to fix them when an owner brings them to me for help, or to prevent them from needing help in the first place.  It's an affair of the heart for me, as I suspect it is for most vets."

Dr. Dave Jolly grew up in Oklahoma and Texas, completed his undergraduate work at Michigan State University, and received his DVM from Texas A&M University in 1987.  He then completed an intensive internship at Angell Memorial Animal Hospital in Boston.  He has designed, built and owned two veterinary hospitals before selling in 2018.  Along with his dogs Kylie (Aussie cross) and Wicker (Labrador Retriever), he enjoys hiking and skiing and simple daily walks with the girls.  He also has two young black cats, Leo and Bart, affectionate characters both of them.